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October 2021

Tuesday, 26 October 2021 00:00

What Do Orthotics Do?

Shoe inserts that are designed to relieve pain caused by various foot conditions are known as orthotics. Common foot conditions treated by orthotics may include corns and calluses, tendonitis, bunions, heel pain, and stress fractures. Orthotics can also help non-foot related issues such as correcting posture and alignment. Orthotics come in a variety of types, including custom made ones, cushioned ones that absorb shock, and pressure relieving orthotics that distribute body weight across the sole of the foot. A podiatrist will consider many factors when prescribing orthotics, which include any existing foot conditions, the structure of the foot, biomechanics, and the patient’s lifestyle. If you believe that orthotics are right for you, a podiatrist will be able to help point you in the right direction. 

If you are having discomfort in your feet and would like to try orthotics, contact Peter C. Smith from Lancaster Podiatry. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Are Orthotics?

Orthotics are inserts you can place into your shoes to help with a variety of foot problems such as flat feet or foot pain. Orthotics provide relief and comfort for minor foot and heel pain but can’t correct serious biomechanical problems in your feet.

Over-the-Counter Inserts

Orthotics come in a wide variety of over-the-counter inserts that are used to treat foot pain, heel pain, and minor problems. For example, arch supports can be inserted into your shoes to help correct overarched or flat feet, while gel insoles are often used because they provide comfort and relief from foot and heel pain by alleviating pressure.

Prescription Orthotics

If over-the-counter inserts don’t work for you or if you have a more severe foot concern, it is possible to have your podiatrist prescribe custom orthotics. These high-quality inserts are designed to treat problems such as abnormal motion, plantar fasciitis, and severe forms of heel pain. They can even be used to help patients suffering from diabetes by treating foot ulcers and painful calluses and are usually molded to your feet individually, which allows them to provide full support and comfort.

If you are experiencing minor to severe foot or heel pain, it’s recommended to speak with your podiatrist about the possibilities of using orthotics. A podiatrist can determine which type of orthotic is right for you and allow you to take the first steps towards being pain-free.

If you have any questions please contact our office located in Lancaster, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about Foot Orthotics
Published in Blog
Tuesday, 19 October 2021 00:00

Advanced Treatments for Diabetic Foot Ulcers

Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) affect approximately 15% of Americans who have diabetes. These wounds can be difficult to treat, as they often go undetected until they have progressed and have a poor blood supply, which makes the healing process very slow. Furthermore, people with diabetes are at greater risk of having an impaired immune system, making the wounds more likely to become infected. Fortunately, there have been many recent breakthroughs in wound treatment. Negative pressure wound therapy (NPWT) uses wound dressing and airtight film with a suction device to cover the wound, drain fluid, and promote healthy new tissue growth. Skin grafting has also advanced and can be used to treat DFUs in some patients. To learn more about advanced diabetic wound care, consult with a podiatrist today. 

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Peter C. Smith from Lancaster Podiatry. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Lancaster, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Published in Blog
Sunday, 17 October 2021 00:00

Are Bunions Affecting Your Everyday Life?

Have you noticed a bony protrusion on the side of your big toe? If so, you may have developed the foot condition known as a bunion. Don't let bunions interfere with your daily activities.

Published in Blog
Tuesday, 12 October 2021 00:00

When Ankle Sprains Do Not Heal Properly 

Ankle sprains are common injuries that cause the ligaments that support the ankle joint to become overly stretched or torn. If an ankle sprain does not heal properly additional sprains may occur, which may lead to ankle instability. Ankle instability can cause pain, tenderness, or swelling in the ankle, as well as make it feel wobbly or loose. Your weakened ankle may also roll out frequently on the lateral side of your foot when you are walking, standing, or playing sports. If you exhibit any of these symptoms and have had previous ankle sprains, you may be experiencing chronic ankle instability. Make an appointment with a podiatrist to receive a proper diagnosis and determine a treatment method that is specific to you. 

Although ankle sprains are common, they aren’t always minor injuries. If you need your ankle injury looked at, contact Peter C. Smith from Lancaster Podiatry. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

How Does an Ankle Sprain Occur?

Ankle sprains are the result of a tear in the ligaments within the ankle. These injuries may happen when you make a rapid shifting movement while your foot is planted. A less common way to sprain your ankle is when your ankle rolls inward while your foot turns outward.

What Are the Symptoms?

  • Pain at the sight of the tear
  • Bruising/Swelling
  • Ankle area is tender to touch
  • In severe cases, may hear/feel something tear
  • Skin discoloration

Preventing a Sprain

  • Wearing appropriate shoes for the occasion
  • Stretching before exercises and sports
  • Knowing your limits

Treatment of a Sprain

In many cases, the RICE method (Rest, Ice, Compression, and Elevate) is used to treat ankle sprains. However, you should see a podiatrist to see which treatment option would work best with your injury. In severe cases, surgery may be required.

It is important to ask your doctor about rehab options after you receive treatment for your injury. Stretching, strength training, and balance exercises may help the ankle heal while also preventing further injury.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Lancaster, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Ankle Sprains
Published in Blog
Tuesday, 05 October 2021 00:00

All About Bunionectomies

A bunionectomy is a surgical procedure that is used to remove a bunion and bring the big toe (and any other affected structures in the foot) back into proper alignment. During the surgery, anesthesia is used to numb your foot. The surgeon then makes one or more incisions near the bunion to remove extra bone or tissue, realign the bones, or straighten the toe. In some cases, the toe joint may be operated on to rebuild or repair it. Bunionectomies are typically outpatient procedures, which means that you will get to go home the same day as your surgery. You may be given a toe spacer, post-surgical shoe, or mobility device to help hold your foot in the right position and keep weight off of it while you heal. It can take several months to fully recover. To learn more about bunion surgery and to find out if it’s the right treatment for you, please speak with a podiatrist. 

If you are suffering from bunion pain, contact Peter C. Smith of Lancaster Podiatry. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

What Is a Bunion?

Bunions are painful bony bumps that usually develop on the inside of the foot at the joint of the big toe. As the deformity increases over time, it may become painful to walk and wear shoes. Women are more likely to exacerbate existing bunions since they often wear tight, narrow shoes that shift their toes together. Bunion pain can be relieved by wearing wider shoes with enough room for the toes.

Causes

  • Genetics – some people inherit feet that are more prone to bunion development
  • Inflammatory Conditions - rheumatoid arthritis and polio may cause bunion development

Symptoms

  • Redness and inflammation
  • Pain and tenderness
  • Callus or corns on the bump
  • Restricted motion in the big toe

In order to diagnose your bunion, your podiatrist may ask about your medical history, symptoms, and general health. Your doctor might also order an x-ray to take a closer look at your feet. Nonsurgical treatment options include orthotics, padding, icing, changes in footwear, and medication. If nonsurgical treatments don’t alleviate your bunion pain, surgery may be necessary.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact our office located in Lancaster, PA . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Bunions
Published in Blog
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